If you think a Pug is right for you, and if you are at the stage when you are ready to welcome one into your home, then it is time to start looking into the details surrounding a purchase.

The Pug is a breed known to be plagued with numerous hereditary health conditions, which is why it is so important to be aware of these and to choose a dog breeder carefully.

The way you prepare before buying the perfect Pug puppy or a Pug cross, such as a Jug (a popular dog mix between a Jack Russell Terrier and a Pug), will help you find the perfect Pug puppy for you and your family.

About Pug Puppies

When you see a pug puppy for the first time, it is almost guaranteed that you’ll fall head over heels in love. They are tiny at eight weeks, the age when they are ready to leave their mothers, and a dog so small and flat-faced provokes an immediate need to care for it and love it.

Pug puppies have their characteristic look already from puppyhood; with the large protruding eyes, short snout and wide mouth. They can sometimes be a little “top-heavy” due to their big heads. So don’t be surprised if they tip over and fall into their food- or water bowl at least once.

A pug puppy will have you giggling in no time, with their fun-loving personalities being evident from an early age, and they tend to be filled with energy! There is a common misconception of Pug dogs being calm and lazy, and while this might be true for older Pugs – Pug puppies and adolescent Pugs can be a handful.

What to look out for when buying a Pug puppy

Pug Puppy

With Pugs or any other dog breed, you will never have their health guaranteed to a 100%. But, there are a few things you can look at to avoid picking a puppy that will be going in and out of the vet clinic (at best). Make sure you get to see and interact with the puppy before you purchase it.

This is the only way you will get to observe the puppy’s behavior and health. You can’t always see a health issue on the outside, but the puppy should look and act healthy. Be cautious of any seller who won’t let you meet the puppy first, before deciding whether to go through with the purchase.

Observe how the puppy acts. Is it outgoing and curious, the way pug puppies tend to be, or is it shy and cautious? Shy Pug dogs may seem adorable, but it could be a sign of an anxious dog that will struggle to become well-adjusted and adequately socialized.

Odd behaviors could also be a sign of illness. So try not to get a Pug puppy just because you feel sorry for it. Instead, keep an eye out for one that looks chubby, healthy, and happy.

Pug Life Stages

Three Pug Dogs

Pugs usually live between 12 and 14 years, and they go through numerous life stages before they reach those golden years. Both males and female Pugs mature somewhat late for a small dog, and they are often very active and energetic as puppies.

This comes as a surprise to many new Pug owners, as they have often imagined Pugs to be a lot calmer than they actually are. Pugs are nutty little dogs, no doubt about it. It is almost as if they have too much energy for it to fit inside their bodies, sometimes resulting in hyperactive behavior.

It is one of the dog breeds that tend to calm down as they get older, and while it can vary from dog to dog, it seems to happen somewhere around the age of 3-5. It is vital to care appropriately for your Pug throughout both puppyhood and adulthood, to set them up for a long and hopefully healthy life, and happy and comfortable senior years.

Pug Health Concerns

Pug Puppy Lying Down

If you have read up on the breed, which you always should before buying a dog, you already know that Pugs – just like other flat-faced dogs like the French Bulldog – are prone to numerous health issues. Hip dysplasia is common in Pugs, and Pug dog mixes, and so is patellar luxation, Encephalitis, an elongated palate, and Legg-Perthes disease.

Both male and female Pugs are also highly prone to obesity, and some seem to gain weight despite being fed reasonable amounts of dog food. Being aware of these health issues will help you prevent them. Or, at least, catch any early signs so that your Pug can get the veterinary help he or she needs to get better.

Pugs are adorable, but unfortunately, they are not the healthiest dog breed. That is something every Pug owner needs to accept and understand, preferably already before you start looking at puppies available for purchase.

Pug Breeder Information

When you are dealing with this type of a dog, that has all these hereditary health issues; you need to take yourself the time to find a suitable dog breeder. Look up responsible and registered Pug breeders through the AKC (American Kennel Club), or the equivalent in whatever country you reside in.

It may seem tempting to get a cheap puppy you find in an ad online. However, cheap can quickly become expensive if your puppy turns out to have health problems.

Responsible Pug breeders work actively to maintain and better a breed, which makes it worth the extra money you will spend buying a puppy with a good genetic background.

Pug Puppy Diet

Observe what your Pug puppy eats because as cute is it may be with a fat pug puppy, it isn’t healthy. It is best to establish a healthy eating routine already from the beginning. Do your research to find the best puppy food for your soft-coated Pug baby.

Skip the commercial brands and go for a high-quality puppy kibble that is rich in protein and fatty acids like DHA. A proper diet will set your Pug puppy up for long and hopefully healthy life.

Is a Pug Right for You?

Pugs are excellent family dogs, and they are good at adapting to most lifestyles. They can live happily in a smaller space like an apartment but will need exercise to burn off some of the excess energy. You also need to be prepared to give up your personal space, as Pugs seem strangely unfamiliar with the concept.

They will always sit a little too close to you, follow you around, leave hair everywhere and pop up where you least expect to see them. But, the truth is – you can’t complain! Pugs are adorable, and they are great dogs for anyone who has read up on the breed and understands what it requires.

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